English

Current Course Offerings

Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.
Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.

Courses Offered in Other Terms

ENGL220

Literature in English to the 18th Century
A survey of prose, poetry and drama to the 18th Century. Prerequisite: See calendar. Either (a) ARTS 001 or ASTU 100 or (d) ASTU 150 and one of ENGL 110, ENGL 111, ENGL 120, ENGL 121; or 6 credits of first-year English. Prerequisite: See calendar. Either (a) ARTS 001 or ASTU 100 or (d) ASTU 150 and one of ENGL 110, ENGL 111, ENGL 120, ENGL 121; or 6 credits of first-year English.

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ENGL230A

From the Middle Ages to the present English literature has been profoundly influenced by the language, genres, narrative patterns and imagery of Biblical and classical writing. This course surveys a number of the most important works of these two traditions. Please note that this is not a Religious Studies course, a Classical Studies course or a History course. It is a course where we treat both Biblical and classical texts as great works of literature that have significantly shaped the English literary tradition. Prerequisite: See calendar. From the Middle Ages to the present English literature has been profoundly influenced by the language, genres, narrative patterns and imagery of Biblical and classical writing. This course surveys a number of the most important works of these two traditions. Please note that this is not a Religious Studies course, a Classical Studies course or a History course. It is a course where we treat both Biblical and classical texts as great works of literature that have significantly shaped the English literary tradition. Prerequisite: See calendar.

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ENGL319

History of the English Language: Later History
Principles of language change. The development and spread of the English language from the Norman Conquest to the Modern English period.

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ENGL320

This class examines the development of the English language from West Germanic to the present; phonology, morphology, syntax and vocabulary.

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ENGL340

Introduction to Old English
Old English grammar, with readings in the prose of the period. This course is designed to give students a reading knowledge of Old English. About a third of the course is taken up by a study of Old English grammar; the other two thirds is devoted to reading some Old English prose passages such as Bede’s account of the poet Caedmon or Aelfric’s Life of St. Edmund.

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ENGL343

Old English Literature
The best-known and most-read work of Old English literature without doubt is Beowulf, and this Old English epic is the central text for this course. Topics to be examined are e.g. the nature of the hero, the pagan/Christian dichotomy, the role of women, orality and literacy, the Other as monster, re-composing and appropriating earlier tales, etc. Before study of the poem proper begins, the course briefly acquaints students with some Anglo-Saxon elegiac literature (e.g. The Wanderer, The Seafarer) and battle poetry (e.g. The Battle of Maldon, The Battle of Brunanburh), since both elegiac and martial motifs are woven together in the epic. If time allows, the course concludes with a brief survey of some modern-day retellings of the epic (e.g. The Tower of Beowulf) and their political/ideological biases. Prerequisite: ENGL 340.

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ENGL344A

Medieval Studies – MEDIEVAL STUDIES
The English Department typically offers two sections of this course every year, each section worth 3 credits and treating different topics which vary from year to year. Recent and upcoming offerings include such topics as Making Malory; Women Writers of the Middle Ages; the Arthurian Tradition; Medieval Literature and Medievalism. This course usually focuses on non-Chaucerian material from the Middle English period; some readings are in Middle English, others in translation.

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ENGL344B

Medieval Studies – MEDIEVAL STUDIES
The English Department typically offers two sections of this course every year, each section worth 3 credits and treating different topics which vary from year to year. Recent and upcoming offerings include such topics as Making Malory; Women Writers of the Middle Ages; the Arthurian Tradition; Medieval Literature and Medievalism. This course usually focuses on non-Chaucerian material from the Middle English period; some readings are in Middle English, others in translation.

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ENGL346B

Chaucer and the Middle Ages – CHAUCER&MID AGES
A detailed study of Chaucer’s major works. When offered for 6 credits, this course surveys Chaucer’s entire career, including the dream visions and lyrics, Troilus and Criseyde, and the Canterbury Tales. When 3 credits, the course focuses on the Canterbury Tales. In either case, the course includes attention to Chaucer’s literary and historical contexts, with readings in translation from sources and analogues of his works, and to the range of scholarship on his work, with selective readings in criticism. Readings from Chaucer in Middle English; some class time is devoted to pronouncing and understanding Chaucer’s language. Offered every year.

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ENGL352

Middle English
The course studies the forms and development of the language, considering such aspects of Middle English as the shift from a synthetic to an analytic language; sound changes from Old English; regional variation; the influence of Latin, Anglo-Norman and French, and Old Norse; and the literary uses of the language. Rarely offered.

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ENGL356

Chaucer
For Honours Students. Focusing upon a selection of Chaucer’s major works ( Troilus and Criseyde , The Book of the Duchess , ‘The Knight’s Tale’, and others), drawn from both the Canterbury Tales and his wider oeuvre, this course will examine both the traditions and texts that influence Chaucer’s poetry (Boethius, Boccacio, Dante, Popular English Romance) and the considerable influence that his writing had on the later Chaucerian poets (Lydgate, Henryson, Dunbar, and others). By examining Chaucer’s poems in the context of wider medieval poetry, we illuminate both his literary transformation of his sources and the lasting impact of his literary legacy on the work of his literary descendents.

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ENGL417

The Literature of the Bible
This course focuses on the close reading of representative Biblical texts (particularly Genesis, Exodus, Judges, Samuel, Job, Psalms, Canticles, Isaiah, the Gospels, the letters of Paul and Revelation) in the light of ancient analogues (such as The Epic of Gilgamesh), later interpretations (such as the Catholic Middle Ages, the Protestant Reformation, Evangelism, the Oxford Movement, American denominations and the United Church of Canada), recent challenges (such as Darwinism, feminism, postcolonialism, and lesbian and gay movements) and representative works of English literature (such as medieval mystery plays, Milton, Blake, Browning, Eliot, Timothy Findley, Toni Morrison, Thomas King and Tony Kushner).

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Winter 2016
No ENGL course(s) were found for W2016 term.