Scandinavian

Current Course Offerings

Winter 2017

SCAN335 Vikings and Norse Mythology (in English) Sections

History, literature, and mythology of early Scandinavian societies.

Designed to introduce students to the history, literature and mythology of the so-called “Viking Age,” (from the 793 Viking raid on Lindisfarne to the 1066 defeat at the Battle of Stamford Bridge), this course provides necessary historical context for reading the texts produced between the twelfth and the fourteenth century. Almost all the texts about “Vikings” were written after the “Viking Age.” Vikings did not call themselves Vikings, did not wear horned helmets, and did not produce written accounts. The texts were either written by outsiders or by later Scandinavian writers who lived in very different social and religious environments. The Viking world is an observer construct. Students learn about the cultural and political dynamics of the Norsemen as well as the cultural and political dynamics that fuel the cultural construction of the Norsemen and the North. Taught in English.
Read More...

Winter 2017

SCAN415 The World of the Sagas (in English) Sections

Scandinavian contributions to medieval and early modern world literature, culture and history.

Scandinavian contributions to medieval and early modern world literature, culture and history.
Read More...

Winter 2017

SCAN501 Old Icelandic Sections

Though 501 is usually taught as a 6-credit course, students may elect to take the first term only, "Introduction to Old Icelandic," for 3 credits.

This course deals with the rudiments of Old Icelandic grammar and literature. The reading of texts is started almost immediately, and points of grammar, language and history are treated as students read texts in Norse mythology, legend, and history. Two family sagas are read in English translation and discussed. Permission of the instructor required. Offered rarely.
Read More...

Courses Offered in Other Terms

SCAN335

Designed to introduce students to the history, literature and mythology of the so-called “Viking Age,” (from the 793 Viking raid on Lindisfarne to the 1066 defeat at the Battle of Stamford Bridge), this course provides necessary historical context for reading the texts produced between the twelfth and the fourteenth century. Almost all the texts about “Vikings” were written after the “Viking Age.” Vikings did not call themselves Vikings, did not wear horned helmets, and did not produce written accounts. The texts were either written by outsiders or by later Scandinavian writers who lived in very different social and religious environments. The Viking world is an observer construct. Students learn about the cultural and political dynamics of the Norsemen as well as the cultural and political dynamics that fuel the cultural construction of the Norsemen and the North. Taught in English.

Read More....


SCAN415

Scandinavian contributions to medieval and early modern world literature, culture and history.

Read More....


SCAN501

This course deals with the rudiments of Old Icelandic grammar and literature. The reading of texts is started almost immediately, and points of grammar, language and history are treated as students read texts in Norse mythology, legend, and history. Two family sagas are read in English translation and discussed. Permission of the instructor required. Offered rarely.

Read More....


Winter 2017

SCAN333 Major Works of Scandinavian Literature (in English) Sections

Selected Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, and Icelandic texts ranging from Old Norse sagas to contemporary literary works against the background of literary, social, and political developments in Scandinavia.

SCAN335 Vikings and Norse Mythology (in English) Sections

History, literature, and mythology of early Scandinavian societies.

SCAN336 Scandinavian Crime Fiction (in English) Sections

Crime fictions and films as a mirror of Scandinavian society.

SCAN411A Scandinavian Drama and Film in Translation - DRAMA & FILM TRN Sections

Traces the explosive development of a provincial theatre into one of the seminal forces of twentieth-century drama and film. Emphasis on Ibsen, Strindberg, and Bergman.

SCAN413B The Literatures of the Baltic in English Translation - LIT BLT ENG TRAN Sections

An examination through literature of the historical, cultural, and ethnic elements that have made the Baltic area the crossroads of northeastern Europe. The emphasis is on literature from the Germanic and Finno-Ugric languages. Authors to be studied include Strindberg, Tikkanen, Transtromer, Kaplinski, Grass, Bobrowski, Lenz.

SCAN414 Topics in Danish and Northern European Cultural Studies (in English). Sections

Selected topics, such as ethnicity, migration, identity, women's issues, Danish and Northern European film.